Item #4245 Reglemens et statuts, Concernant le Commerce, Art & Fabrique des draps, Or, Argent, & Soye, & autres Etoffes mélangées, qui se font dans la ville de Lyon & Faux-bourgs d'icelle, & dans tout le Pais de Lyonnois. SILK INDUSTRY.
Reglemens et statuts, Concernant le Commerce, Art & Fabrique des draps, Or, Argent, & Soye, & autres Etoffes mélangées, qui se font dans la ville de Lyon & Faux-bourgs d'icelle, & dans tout le Pais de Lyonnois.
The warp and the weft

Reglemens et statuts, Concernant le Commerce, Art & Fabrique des draps, Or, Argent, & Soye, & autres Etoffes mélangées, qui se font dans la ville de Lyon & Faux-bourgs d'icelle, & dans tout le Pais de Lyonnois. Lyon: André Laurens, 1708.

8vo (178 x 110 mm). 62 leaves, irregularly paginated: 95, [1 blank], [7], [1 blank], 3-15, [1 blank], 91-104 pp. (complete). Woodcut arms of Lyon on title, woodcut and typographic headpieces, woodcut initials. Short marginal tear in second leaf, marginal dampstain or spotting to a handful of leaves. Contemporary French gold-tooled russet goatskin, sides paneled with double fillets, central panel with fleuron tool repeated corners, spine gold-tooled in six compartments, gilt edges, marbled endpapers (small stains to covers, extremities rubbed, but a nice copy); old ink inscription, “Reglemens,” on front cover. ***

An attractive copy of a comprehensive edition of the many ordinances governing the Lyonese silk industry, regulating production and commerce as well as the important guilds of silk weavers and merchants. This edition contains the 67 regulations promulgated by Colbert and published in Lyon in 1667, followed by subsequent legal judgments, decrees, and royal letters patent.

In 1536 Francis I granted the first privileges to textile entrepreneurs in Lyon, and the guild of Lyonese workers in “draps d'or, d'argent et soie” was established. The earliest known printed regulations of this Lyonese luxury textile industry date to 1554. The burgeoning industry attracted a growing population to the city, and it soon became the major source of textiles for the Court. Under Colbert, strict and very detailed quality controls were enacted (in 1667). Along with technical developments, this boosted the industry, which by the end of the seventeenth century had succeeded in rivaling the traditionally dominant Italian production of silk and other luxury textiles.

Some of the earlier statutes included in this edition are standard guild-related rules (prohibition against work on Sundays and feast days, worker protection, record-keeping, apprenticeships, funeral ceremonies, etc.), but most relate specifically to the commerce and production of silk. These rules fall into the categories of regulated materials, weaves, etc.; strict control of the commerce in textiles; and domestic protectionism. The later statutes add more detailed rules both concerning modalities of enforcement and the materials, measurements, and even stitches allowed for different types of fabric.

Each type of textile and weave was subject to precise rules governing its purity and composition. The technical precision of these regulations, as well as their vocabulary, make these statutes a valuable source for textile historians (one example among many: “qu’il sera permis de faire de Filatrices, Papelines, Raze de S. Maur, & autres semblables étoffes plaines ou figurées ... tant à deux & quatre fils par dent de peigne qu’au dessus, done les lisieres seront, soit de la couleur de la chaine ou autrement, & seront les chaines d’organcin filé tordu au moulin, & les trames de floret, galette, ou autre bourre de soye, [etc.]” - p. 61).

The various sections were clearly issued separately, accounting for the odd pagination, and at least one section must have had its own title, here removed (the “Lettres patentes et arrest du Conseil, portant reglement pour la manufacture des Etofes de Soye, Or & Argent de la Ville de Lyon. Données à Versailles le 2 Janv. 1703 ... ” [drop-title]).

OCLC records one US copy of this edition, at Harvard.
Item #4245

Price: $950.00